Jez Higgins

Freelance software generalist
software created
extended or repaired


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Thursday 06 December 2007 JezUK Christmas Tour

The JezUK Christmas tour wrapped up today when I got back to the attic at lunchtime. I presented a revised version of the talk I'd given at the ACCU Conference. I'd been a little unhappy with the original talk afterwards. While I thought the opening section was good, I'd been overly laboured in the middle stretch and built my point too slowly, before rapidly accelerating away like a mad thing towards the finish. The points I was making were sound, but I didn't put them over very well. This time round I expanded the opening section very slightly, but almost completely rewrote the second half using some much stronger examples (one of which is due to m'collegue Thomas Guest), and it worked much better. I enjoyed myself, and the chaps (and they were all chaps, alas) who came along appeared to enjoy it too.

If you're of a programming persuasion, you should give strong consideration to doing a presentation at something like this. You've definitely got something to say, even if you don't think you have. All you have to do is say it. Describe what you do. Tell people something that you know. You'll benefit from the telling, and your audience will benefit from the listening. Go and look at my slides - I haven't discovered some amazing new piece of computer science, all I'm doing is putting an everyday for-loop into (what is for most people) a slightly different context. Just because what you're doing doesn't seem remarkable to you doesn't mean it isn't of interest to others. It is. Even if you tell people something they already know, that's still to the good. Books like Design Patterns and Refactoring, for instance, sell by the wheelbarrowful precisely because they tell people things they already know.

There are currently four ACCU groups in the UK, but there are also Python groups, Perl mongers, LUGS, universities, general programming-type get-togethers and so on and so on in various cities, your own place of employment or client might want to have you. It's not hard to find an audience. All you have to do is do it.




Jez Higgins

Freelance software generalist
software created
extended or repaired

Older posts are available in the archive or through tags.

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My code on GitHub

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About